Nutrition

May|June 2017

May is Mental Health Month

There are a number of foods that provide fuel for our bodies and our brains, that will help us with better mental health!

A variety of protein foods, including lean meats, milk, other diary products, eggs, beans and peas can keep moods in check by providing us with essential amino acids that affect the brain functioning and mental health.

Complex carbohydrates with high fiber contents like whole grains, fruits, vegetables and pasta break down glucose slowly for steady fuel for the body & brain and provide a moderate but lasting effect on brain chemistry.

Omega 3 fatty acids found in fatty fish like salmon, tuna & trout and shellfish like crab, mussels & oysters play a role in the prevention of depression.

Yogurt with probiotics have the ability to target inflammation in depression.

Vegetables high in folic acid like spinach, dark leafy greens, broccoli, and beets have the ability to target inflammation and other underlying systems in depression.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and National Institute of Health and National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.  (2015).  Omega-3 Supplements: In Depth.  Retrieved from https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/omega3/introduction.htm#hed2

National Institute of Health and National Center for Biotechnology Information and U.S. National Library of Medicine. (2016). Supplementation with Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Disorders: A Review of Literature Data. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/274723373

National Institute of Health and National Center for Biotechnology Information and U.S. National Library of Medicine. (2017). Does Diet Matter?  The Use of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) and Other Dietary Supplements in Inflammation-Associated Depression. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27431396

National Institute of Health and National Center for Biotechnology Information and U.S. National Library of Medicine. (2008). Understanding Nutrition, Depression and mental illnesses. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC27383371

2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and U.S. Department of Argriculture. (2015). 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.  Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietary guidelines/2015/guidelines

The Food Principles

Nutritional advice can be confusing, and there are many conflicting messages. Use these 5 questions as your guide to healthy food. The healthiest foods meet all 5 criteria.

Does it come from a plant or an animal?

Would your grandparents and distant ancestors have thrived on it?

Is it a whole food (nut, egg, tomato) or a minimally processed food (cheese, yogurt, butter)?

Would you feed it to your child or infant to give them the healthiest start in life?
Is it organic, free of toxins, preservatives, pesticides and unknown ingredients?